Current Exhibits


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Education Alley

Taking it to the Streets: Grading Downtown Omaha

NOW – June 21, 2020

Grading Downtown

House on the Edge, Douglas Street, 1891, Bostwick-Frohardt/KM3TV Collection, The Durham Museum Photo Archive, BF14-254(04)

To combat six major hills in downtown Omaha the city undertook extensive street projects to lower inclines. This work was done throughout the 1880s–1920s with the largest of the projects being the grading of Dodge Street in 1920. In some locations, buildings were brought down to a new level 18 feet lower than the original foundation. Tempers ran high between neighbors going mad with the constant noise, businesses and homes being literally uprooted and some downtown residents even suing the city for damages and lack of sleep. In the end, the grading of Dodge Street cost over one million dollars and moved over 300,000 cubic yards of dirt. Through this photography exhibit, see what all the fuss was about and how times have changed the streets of downtown Omaha.

Photo Archive Gallery

Sporty Women: The desire to compete

NOW – december 31, 2020

Equal treatment for women in sports is as modern a topic today as it was for women 100 years ago. Concepts of proper lady-like behavior both in actions and dress were present from the early days of female athletics. Using images from The Durham Museum Photo Archive, this exhibit highlights elements of conflicting standards that allowed women to compete in sports if they maintained the appearance of femininity. The selection of images traces changes over time to uniforms and sports women can play while highlighting the long-term conversation about the role of women as athletes.

Photo: Early sporting dress | 1911 | Homer O. Frohardt Collection
The Durham Museum Photo Archive | HOFP-1927

Sporty Women Exhibit

ADMISSION

Adults: $11.00
Seniors (62+): $8.00
Children (ages 3 – 12): $7.00
Children 2 years and under FREE

Members: FREE!

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Some dates have been blacked-out from online purchases due to special events or holidays.

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Omaha Union Station
Byron Reed Gallery

Public Opinion is More Than Law: The First Murder Brought to Court in the Nebraska Territory

Now – March 8, 2020

Charles A. Henry

Portrait of Charles A. Henry, c. 1860, Illustrated by Morton, Watkins, and Miller Courtesy of History of Nebraska

This exhibition was developed by Durham Museum intern and University of Iowa graduate, Allison Buser.

On April 3, 1855 Charles A. Henry shot George Hollister near the town of Bellevue, shocking the residents of the newly established Nebraska Territory. Highlighting objects from the Byron Reed Collection, this exhibit chronicles the course of events from Hollister’s death through Henry’s unusual court case and examines the public’s role in the outcome of the legal proceedings. The incident illustrates the struggle to carry out legitimate justice in the territory amidst settler notions of popular sovereignty, which sometimes interfered with the early judicial system.


SOUND THE ALARM: THE MAKING OF THE OMAHA FIRE DEPARTMENT

Now – March 8, 2020

Sound the Alarm

Charles Derwent, Membership Certificate in the Pioneer Hook and Ladder Company, November 3, 1868
The Byron Reed Collection, BRTEMP652

This exhibition was developed by Durham Museum intern and Creighton University graduate, Alisha Baginski.

The Omaha Fire Department traces its roots to 1860 when the city’s first firefighting company was founded. Called the Pioneer Hook and Ladder Company, these men battled fires through muddy, unpaved streets, hand-carrying buckets of water. In its 25 years of operation, the company evolved, added more stations, held annual parades in honor of the firefighters, formed a Fireman’s Benevolent Association with neighboring towns and more. Using documents from the Byron Reed Collection this exhibit chronicles the Omaha Fire Department’s late 19th century beginnings.