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SAVE THE DATES …
FOR THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR

NOVEMBER 29, 2024 – JANUARY 12, 2025


Soon, it will be time to dust off those ornaments and deck the halls! Christmas at Union Station presented by FNBO returns on November 29, 2024, and we can’t wait to see you at the museum! From the massive 40-foot-tall twinkling tree to holidays around the globe to Santa himself, you won’t want to miss all that we have planned.

Christmas at Union Station

WE’RE ACCEPTING TREE NOMINATIONS

We want your help in finding the next great Christmas tree to display inside the Suzanne and Walter Scott Great Hall! Every year The Durham Museum receives submissions from Omaha-area residents requesting their evergreen tree be selected as the official tree for Christmas at Union Station, and we’re looking for our next tree! Does your tree make the cut? Click on the link below and fill out the form.

NOMINATE YOUR TREE

 

 

Omaha Union Station

Admission

Adults: $15
Seniors (62+): $12
Children (ages 3 – 12): $8
Children 2 years and under FREE

Members: FREE!

BOOK YOUR TICKET »

Advanced tickets are encouraged but not required. Walk-ins welcome.


THE HISTORY OF CHRISTMAS AT UNION STATION

Christmas at Union Station Christmas at Union Station Christmas at Union Station

Back in the 1930s, Union Pacific employees would select and cut a tree from along the railroad right-of-way in the Pacific Northwest, and then transport it to Omaha’s Union Station. In 1971, Union Station closed after Congress established the National Railroad Passenger Corporation, now Amtrak, to handle all railroad passenger travel. The building was donated to the City of Omaha. Union Station reopened as the Western Heritage Museum in 1975, and within the first two weeks the decision was made to re-install a giant tree in the main waiting room of the museum for Christmas. The Christmas at Union Station tradition was alive again!

While Union Pacific employees still harvest today’s tree, they haven’t had to travel nearly as far, as the museum’s tree is donated by a local family. Each summer we send out a call to Omaha area residents for tree nominations. Trees must meet a number of criteria to be considered. Durham staff then scout out each nomination, narrowing it down until the official tree is chosen!

Archive photos shown are from The Durham Museum Photo Archive, or shown courtesy of Union Pacific Museum