FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 – Due to icy road conditions The Durham Museum is closing early, at 4:30PM.

Reminder: With the end of the holiday season, the museum will revert to regular hours and will be closed Mondays, beginning January 7th.

Captain David Haney’s Letter

Hello!
Today: Captain David Haney’s letter

A short one this time. One of the most touching things I have come across is this simple letter. It was written by Captain David Haney to his future son-in-law, John Warren. Captain Haney was a steamboat captain and so he notes that he is sending the letter from the “Office of the Steamer K.P. Kountz at the city of New Orleans” to John Warren in St. Louis in May of 1876.

Captain David Haney’s letter “Dear Sir

   Yours of the 6th at time(?) is before me and Contents duly considered I did not On year and a half ago expect that my Jest would would [sic] come to a reality

   But as you have asked me if I was willing for you to become my son in law well you say that you have nothing but what you ___ ___ __ and ___ good now I will say to this that I would Rather Trust my Daughter to a Poor hard working Ambicious [sic] man than to a Drunken milionair [sic]

Your capitol[sic] is Satisfactory to me if my Girl thinks your love for her is all she Can ask I ____ give my consent

And I hope god [sic] will bless you Both

Respectfully Yours

D Haney”

A note on transcribing documents: Writing [sic] means that I have copied something straight from the original document that was misspelled, the wrong word, or in error. It just denotes that it was not the transcriber’s error. The blank spaces are where I cannot decipher words. I chose to do this instead of guessing and noting that guess with a (?) for ease of reading. It’s less cluttered that way. You may also notice a lack of punctuation…that’s just how people wrote! Luckily Captain Haney had lovely handwriting so this letter can be fairly easily transcribed.

Thanks for reading and see you next time.
Becky

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